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Today's Features

  • Editor’s note: This is the third part in a series interviewing Clear Creek residents who want to bring aspects of farming and agriculture into their backyards. Sometimes called “backyard homesteaders,” they are looking to be more self-sufficient and are raising everything from ducks to bees.

    It’s hard to say how it first started, but chickens, geese, ducks, pheasants, turkeys, quail, horses, mules and most recently peacocks have made their way to the McNeil home.

  • "Swimmers," each wearing two wetsuits, gloves, life vests, helmets and fins, plied the waters of a raging Clear Creek at Lawson Whitewater Park on Saturday to help volunteers train for future water rescues.

    To kick off the exercises, a team of two "swimmers" jumped in the water slightly above the whitewater park. As they were swept downstream, rescuers along the shore threw ropes to them and pulled them in. 

  • My grandfather is 90 years old this week.

    He is a member of the generation that fought a world war, a forgotten war and a cold war. Those conflicts helped forge our nation into what it is today.

    Henry Dahl is a veteran. He was a helicopter test pilot and was featured on the cover of “Life” magazine during the Korean War. His careers included taxi driver, corrections officer and prison camp warden.

  • Editor’s note: This is the second installment of a series profiling Clear Creek residents who want to bring aspects of farming and agriculture into their backyards. Sometimes called “backyard homesteaders,” they are looking to be more self-sufficient and are raising everything from ducks to bees.

    The bantam rooster was missing. He wasn’t inside the coop or behind it.

  • Editor’s note: Clear Creek County is home to a budding recreational marijuana industry — an industry that has blossomed statewide since recreational sales became legal on Jan. 1, 2014. Since then, the state has received $76 million in fees and taxes from this burgeoning business. This is the second installment of a series that will trace the marijuana process over the next several months from seedling to sale, and will follow the money that flows into state coffers.

  • The Idaho Springs Historical Society’s newest president, Rick Wells, hopes to bring more young people and technology into the museum.

    Wells was recently chosen to replace former president Omer Humble, who stepped down to again try his hand at retirement. Humble said he was thrilled that Wells, who has been active in the Historical Society, will be his successor.

    Wells, a registered nurse with St. Anthony Hospital, moved to Idaho Springs two years ago. He began volunteering with the Historical Society because of his passion for the past.

  • When Mary Lou Rutherford was a teenager in Chicago, she watched as the troops left the city by train to fight in World War II.

    The tracks ran behind her home, and she could hear the train building up steam as it approached.

    “I ran out in back and waved to the soldiers, and they would hang out the windows — and one guy said, ‘Honey, when you’re 21, call me,’ “ Rutherford said, laughing.

  • At age 68, Vietnam veteran Gene Eddy is the youngest member of Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 4121 in Idaho Springs.

    Eddy is also roughly the same age as the organization he has volunteered for since 2001.

    When Eddy returned from Vietnam, some posts initially didn’t welcome his generation of soldiers. But when they did, he volunteered side by side with the founding World War II veterans.

  • Blue Spruce Habitat for Humanity began building its first home in Idaho Springs on Sunday.

    “We’re just very excited to get started on this,” Blue Spruce director Kathleen O’Leary said. “It is the first house west of the (Veterans Memorial Tunnels) for us, so we’re very excited.”

    The home is the first of many that likely will be built in the county over the next several years, O’Leary said. Habitat for Humanity is a nonprofit Christian housing ministry that offers affordable homeownership to low-income families.

  • Editor’s note: Clear Creek County is home to a budding recreational marijuana industry — an industry that has blossomed statewide since recreational sales became legal on Jan. 1, 2014. Since then, the state has received $76 million in fees and taxes from this burgeoning business. This is the first installment of a series that will trace the marijuana process over the next several months from seedling to sale, and will follow the money that flows into state coffers.