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Today's Features

  • Local students now can take their creativity into the third dimension at the Idaho Springs Library.
    The library, with the help of fund-raising and grants, purchased a $1,700 LulzBot TAZ 3D printer.

  • Dave Ventimiglia is on a mission to get more people involved in helping residents of the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation.

    Since Sept. 19, Ventimiglia’s mission has included five horses and lots of miles — many of them through Clear Creek and Jefferson counties.

  • For 16-year-old Olivia Urbalejo, prom was a chance to experience the quintessential high-school thrills of fancy clothes, fast friends and memorable times.

    “I always have a fun time at stuff like this,” said Olivia, who joined 60 other campers and 30 volunteers as they listened to live music outdoors before the annual prom at Easter Seals Rocky Mountain Village.

  • The Historical Society of Idaho Springs is celebrating a half-century of preserving the past.
    The nonprofit recognized the milestone with an event Sept. 6 at the Underhill Museum in Idaho Springs. Another, final celebration is also planned during its annual gala Nov. 8 at the Ameristar Casino in Black Hawk.
    “We’re tickled to death to be celebrating our 50th year as an organization and the 20th year of our heritage museum,” said historical society board president Omer Humble.

  • Editor’s note: This is the second installment of a three-part series examining the past, present and future of Clear Creek.

    By Ian Neligh
    Courant Editor
    Through the mountains and down to the plains, Clear Creek has rushed along its jagged banks long before civilization ever found it and the gold hidden within. Its discovery led to industry, economy and community. The tie binding the stream to the people living along its banks will not be broken easily.

    A commitment

  • If a dog is barking or a horse goes on the lam, folks call Jeromie Morgan, one of two animal control officers in Clear Creek County.

    In fact, Morgan spends quite a bit of his work time looking for pet owners. If a dog is running loose, animal control officers will respond right away and try to find the owner, Morgan said. If a dog is barking, he also follows up with the owner, who oftentimes professes ignorance.

    “Those are the easy ones. (Owners say they) aren’t aware that the dogs are barking when they’re not home,” Morgan said.

  • For 16-year-old Olivia Urbalejo, prom was a chance to experience the quintessential dance-night thrills of fancy clothes, fast friends and memorable times. 

    "I always have a fun time at stuff like this," said Olivia, who joined 60 other campers and 30 volunteers as they listened to live music outdoors before the annual prom at Easter Seals Rocky Mountain Village.

  • The Countess Magri was the most famous person ever to stay at the Hotel de Paris in Georgetown.
    The countess, probably better known as the former Mrs. General Tom Thumb, appears to have been the most famous person to sign the guestbook in 1893, anyway. Before she married Count Magri, an Italian, the countess was well known in popular American culture. She and her husband were internationally known through the marketing and promotion efforts of circus master P.T. Barnum.

  • At first glance, it didn’t appear Jack the burro would be very speedy.
    Looking a little gaunt in the chest, and with his unkempt, shaggy facial hair, Jack looked perfectly comfortable trimming the lush grass at Courtney-Riley-Cooper Park in Idaho Springs during Sunday’s burro races at Tommy Knockers Mining Days.

  • Many people pass through Idaho Springs on their way to somewhere else, but few do it on foot — and even fewer are in the midst of a stroll across the country in both directions.
    Armand Young, 53, is making the walk while hefting a 63-pound pole draped with American flags, all in the name of kindness.