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Today's Features

  • A good old-fashioned carnival describes the scene at the Elks Lodge in Idaho Springs on Friday afternoon.

    Hundreds of children and their families turned out for the second annual event, which this year will help a family in the county with a child with cancer and the Clear Creek Children’s Choir.

  • Editor’s note: Beneath the unassuming Clear Creek County courthouse is a 30,000-square-foot detention facility that houses as many as 80 inmates at a time. Last year the self-contained county jail held 787 arrestees and served 52,391 meals. It regularly provides medical attention, education and other services for detainees and inmates. This is the first of a three-part series exploring the inner workings of the county’s jail.

  • Elected official, firefighter, father, husband, musician, storyteller, friend and mentor — Tom Hayden was remembered in a host of tributes, live music and memories on Saturday.

    Hayden, a Clear Creek County commissioner nearing the end of his first elected term, died unexpectedly on Feb. 29.

    Nearly 300 people gathered in a field on Upper Bear Creek to remember Hayden’s life and times, with a dozen friends and family members sharing their memories.

  • Silence permeated the buildings and landscape around the 27-acre Argo Gold Mine and Mill in Idaho Springs recently, as a handful of staff members prepared the iconic tourist destination for its opening on April 1.

    Amid the tailings piles, museums and historic buildings, Bob Bowland sees a busy future complete with a hotel, restaurant, housing and conference center.

    The former mining mill was purchased Jan. 11 for an undisclosed amount by a group of six business partners, including Bowland and Denver developer Dana Crawford.

  • Despite the obvious robotic pandemonium, members of the Clear Creek High School Robotics Team remained calm during their first trip to the state championships on Saturday.

    Judges cruised like sharks through the crowds made up of teams at the prestigious FIRST Tech Challenge state competition in the gym of Denver’s Mountain Range High School.

    Before the competition, the Clear Creek team C2 Botz focused on practice runs, trying again and again to get their robot to perform the required tasks.

  • A storefront in Empire is filled with the crisp and precise sounds of dozens of antique clocks.

    They whirl, turn, move and keep time in a variety of clever ways. And the ticking, tocking, clicking and clacking create a cadence that is music to Jon Hathcock’s ears.

    With more than 20 years in the clock repair business, Hathcock loves to disassemble and restore the silver and brass structures created to measure time.

  • For the second year, the Clear Creek rec center is sponsoring the running-based youth development program Girls on the Run starting March 8.

    The after-school program will be held on Tuesdays and Thursdays for 10 weeks and is open to any girl in the county in third- through fifth-grade. It focuses on empowerment and fitness, culminating in a 5K run.

    Retired Carlson teacher Anne-Marie Schmidt volunteered to coach the program last year and was so impressed that she decided to do it again this year.

  • With dark, early-morning shadows still clinging to the buildings in Idaho Springs, a handful of people crowd into the small kitchen, roll up their sleeves and get to work.

    Today’s menu consists of barbecued country-style pork ribs, succotash, cornbread and peach cobbler.

    Employees and volunteers cook, clean, organize and prepare for the Volunteers of America Meals on Wheels program in the Project Support Senior Center on Miner Street.

  • With perseverance, enthusiasm and a plucky little four-wheel-drive robot, the Clear Creek High School Robotics Team is headed to the state championships the last weekend in February.

    Last Thursday the team C2 Botz met in a classroom to tinker with its robot in preparation for the prestigious FIRST Tech Challenge state competition.

  • Editor’s note: This is the first installment of a series about the growing senior population in the mountain area.

    Depending on whom you ask, the baby boom generation either popularized self-indulgence or helped create a more egalitarian America. But whether rotten or visionary, the generation born between 1946 and 1964 isn’t a kid anymore, and its final chapter promises changes and challenges to match any that have come before.