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Today's Features

  • Tiffany Morrell, a Georgetown resident and an Iraq veteran, plans to use her military experience as a Clear Creek County paramedic in the future.

  • Trucker the pit bull is back with his owner, Graham Holiman, in Arkansas, thanks to a microchip scan done at Charlie’s Place — the Clear Creek County animal shelter.

     The moral of the story? Have a microchip implanted in your pet and make sure you keep the information up to date if you move, Charlie’s Place director Sue LeBarron told Clear Creek’s county commissioners at a recent meeting. Charlie’s Place in Dumont does the microchip procedure for $15, she said.

  • A mustachioed, malevolent and even slightly maleficent villain will enter stage right during the Mill Creek Valley Historical Society’s melodrama on Saturday evening.

  • The fourth Clear Creek County Community Emergency Response Team class graduated on Saturday, adding another group of residents prepared to act in an emergency.
    The Community Emergency Response Team is a national effort to educate people in basic disaster response, such as fire suppression, light search and rescue, team organization, and disaster medical operations.
    The local branch of the program has graduated four classes in six years.

  • Clear Creek High School’s annual homecoming parade down Miner Street last Thursday was packed with school spirit.

  • Local students now can take their creativity into the third dimension at the Idaho Springs Library.
    The library, with the help of fund-raising and grants, purchased a $1,700 LulzBot TAZ 3D printer.

  • On Oct. 24, more than 100 Georgetown Community School students did the slide, shoulder shuffle, hand-clap, dance-step combination of Michael Jackson’s iconic “Thriller” dance.

  • Dave Ventimiglia is on a mission to get more people involved in helping residents of the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation.

    Since Sept. 19, Ventimiglia’s mission has included five horses and lots of miles — many of them through Clear Creek and Jefferson counties.

  • For 16-year-old Olivia Urbalejo, prom was a chance to experience the quintessential high-school thrills of fancy clothes, fast friends and memorable times.

    “I always have a fun time at stuff like this,” said Olivia, who joined 60 other campers and 30 volunteers as they listened to live music outdoors before the annual prom at Easter Seals Rocky Mountain Village.

  • The Historical Society of Idaho Springs is celebrating a half-century of preserving the past.
    The nonprofit recognized the milestone with an event Sept. 6 at the Underhill Museum in Idaho Springs. Another, final celebration is also planned during its annual gala Nov. 8 at the Ameristar Casino in Black Hawk.
    “We’re tickled to death to be celebrating our 50th year as an organization and the 20th year of our heritage museum,” said historical society board president Omer Humble.