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Education

  • Teachers question new administrative structure

    Some Clear Creek teachers are concerned that the school board’s plan for teacher-leaders in schools hasn’t been clearly thought out.

    They say the position description is too vague, the positions have hidden responsibilities, and teachers wouldn’t be compensated for all of the additional time they would put into performing the duties.

    The teacher-leaders are part of a new administrative structure the school board has agreed to but hasn’t formally approved. 

    The structure would do two things:

  • ‘Another world’

    Bassir Atayee politely stood to the side as the class passed by to get to their seats. At 23 years old, Atayee is only a little older than the Clear Creek High School students.

  • Working through careers

    Clear Creek High senior Rachelle Talbot starts her days in the elementary school she attended as a child.

    Talbot goes from class to class helping students and teachers at King-Murphy Elementary School. She is one of the first interns in Clear Creek High School’s recently reorganized internship program, and she feels she’s been transformed by the experience.

  • Principals leery of price tag to realign curriculum

    Clear Creek’s high school and middle school principals are concerned that funds spent on hiring a curriculum consultant will hurt other educational programs.

    The fears were expressed at an April 10 school board work session on whether a consultant should be hired to align curriculum among district schools.

    The district could pay about $130,000 over two years for the curriculum alignment. The board is discussing tapping into its reserve funds or applying to the Henderson Mine for a grant to pay for half the cost.

  • A morning jolt of jazz

    The foyer of Clear Creek Middle/High School was rockin’ with live jazz Monday morning as the high school’s arts classes kicked off the annual Arts Week.

    Three teachers and a handful of students performed starting at 7:45 a.m., with two dozen students and teachers stopping to listen and applaud appreciatively.

    “I love it when they do this,” school secretary Terry Bennett said as she listened to the music from her desk in the office. “It puts a great spin on the day.”

  • A matter of principal

    Clear Creek High senior Cody Hill has learned that being a school principal isn’t as easy as some might think.

    Cody was principal for a day on March 21, and he attended meetings, helped select songs the school choir will sing at graduation, distributed treats to teachers, and recognized students on the honor roll.

    “It’s been different; that’s for sure,” Cody said about halfway through his day as principal. “I like to see what they do. It takes a lot of leadership and decision-making.”

  • Honor Society inducts 10 students at high school

     By Tina Matthew

    For the Courant

    The Clear Creek High School National Honor Society inducted 10 members on March 5 at a ceremony in the school media center. 

    Current NHS members hosted the ceremony for the inductees. Members created a welcoming setting and told the audience of more than 20 parents, siblings, teachers and friends about the requirements for becoming a member.  

  • Honor Society inducts 10 students at high school

    By Tina Matthew

    For the Courant

    The Clear Creek High School National Honor Society inducted 10 members on March 5 at a ceremony in the school media center. 

    Current NHS members hosted the ceremony for the inductees. Members created a welcoming setting and told the audience of more than 20 parents, siblings, teachers and friends about the requirements for becoming a member.  

  • School district considers outside help to align curriculum

    Despite a looming budget deficit, the Clear Creek school board is considering dipping into reserve funds to pay a contractor to help align the curriculum throughout all grades rather than keep a curriculum director on staff.

    The contractor would cost between $25,000 and $300,000, Superintendent Todd Lancaster told the board during a study session last Thursday. The district is talking with four firms to narrow the estimate.

  • Students let it bee at King-Murphy

    What do fifth-grader Bode Dalton and second-grader Haley Cain have in c-o-m-m-o-n at King-Murphy Elementary School?

    They were finalists in the school’s spelling bee last Thursday. The two bested 28 other students, with Bode taking first place and Haley taking second.

    Bode spelled “preserve” and “amigo” to win. 

    After the bee, both were surrounded by classmates who congratulated them on their success.