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Outdoors

  • Highway overpasses: wildly successful
  • Underestimated, unloved creature is a popular Halloween icon

    Children fear them above all else. Over half of women and one in 10 men have varying degrees of aversion to them. One to three million of them are present per acre of land, and no human is more than 10 feet away from this creature at any time.

    Being portrayed as scheming, cunning beasts with bloodlust, such as Lord of the Rings’ Shelob or Harry Potter’s Aragog, it’s no surprise that spiders are so maligned and feared.

  • Wildfires are a reset button for nature

    Several years have elapsed since Colorado’s foothills have seen significant fires, but the haze that persisted over our skies reminds us that the danger of forest fires is real. We worry about homes, pets and memories. But with wildfire as the most serious threat to our state, what happens to the wild animals when the fires ignite and begin rapidly spreading along with its acrid smoke and extreme heat?
    For pets and livestock, there are plans in place.

  • SHARE with your wild neighbors

    Christie Greene
    She was lying in a shallow ditch, very still, when our dogs spotted her. They sniffed her curiously, and before we could react, one dog gave her a quick lick on the nose before we shooed them away.
    I very slowly approached the tiny elk calf, at first concerned about her condition. Was she hurt? Should I call Parks and Wildlife for help? I agonized that she may even be dead. She was so utterly still. Her body lay in a shallow ditch, her head resting quietly on the path.

  • SHARE with your wild neighbors

    By Christie Greene

    She was lying in a shallow ditch, very still, when our dogs spotted her. They sniffed her curiously, and before we could react, one dog gave her a quick lick on the nose before we shooed them away.

    I very slowly approached the tiny elk calf, at first concerned about her condition. Was she hurt? Should I call Parks and Wildlife for help? I agonized that she may even be dead. She was so utterly still. Her body lay in a shallow ditch, her head resting quietly on the path.

  • Red dogs are our national mammal?

    Christie Greene

  • Bears springing into action after winter hibernation

    By Christie Greene

    Inside the Outdoors

    Last fall, as the days grew shorter and the sun moved lower in the sky, the bears listened to their instincts and began eating, really eating, up to 20,000 calories a day. As their foods sources dwindled and the temperatures began to sink, they ambled into the woods to make a den.

  • Bears springing into action after winter hibernation

    By Christie Greene

    Last fall, as the days grew shorter and the sun moved lower in the sky, the bears listened to their instincts and began eating, really eating, up to 20,000 calories a day. As their foods sources dwindled and the temperatures began to sink, they ambled into the woods to make a den.

    In the meantime, we adjusted our clocks, made soup and readied the snowblowers. While we settled in front of the fire with a book, the thick-coated, fat-laden bruins curled up inside cozy dens and began living off their acquired fat stores. 

  • Mountain community remembers Chow Down’s friendly felines

    By Christie Greene

    Visitors to Chow Down Pet Supplies in Bergen Park may wonder why the store counter seems so wide and empty. Instinctively, we turn to the right, expecting to see two lethargic, lounging cats that were a fixture in the store for more than two decades. Butch and Sundance were a constant presence at the store, presenting lazy tummies and chins for obligatory scratches.

  • Tent caterpillars help more than hurt wildlife

    (Reprinted from March 10, 2010)

    If you are one of the many people who find tent caterpillars objectionable in your backyard, now is the time to control them.

    I know they do little harm in our forests, but I find it difficult to be tolerant of them. Their favorite food is the new leaves of apple trees, so they were very common and considered destructive pests in the apple-growing sections of New York state where I grew up.