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Outdoors

  • Autumn’s dry flowers are fodder for craft projects

    November is often referred to as the brown month. Nightly frosts have put an end to the green growing season, and meadows and prairies have slowly turned brown.

    Although we may have snow, there is seldom enough to stay on the ground for long, and before we settle into the black-and-white days of winter, we have about a month of brown frozen weeds and grasses. November is usually the month when the summer growth has matured and ripened seeds.

  • New director to pave way for progress on Peaks to Plains Trail

    A man who has been heavily involved with plans for the Peaks to Plains Trail as a member of Denver-based THK Associates Inc. will lead the new Clear Creek Greenway Authority.

    Randall Navarro was chosen to be executive director of the authority, officials said Oct. 27. Navarro was not immediately available for comment.

  • The molten gold of autumn in the foothills

    A few weeks ago, the aspen were spectacular in the high country. We could see great rivers of molten gold flowing down every valley. Aspen seem to require a bit of extra moisture, so they tend to follow river valleys.

    Just as it appeared that we were settling in to a long golden fall, we had a rainy day with high gusty winds that stripped the aspen trees of their crop of gold. Then we settled into nearly a week of rainy weather. The additional weight of water-soaked leaves and a few gusts of wind brought most of the remaining leaves down.

  • Elk: It’s what’s for dinner

    Elk, elk everywhere — but not one to eat.

    Local hunters gaze at herds of elk and deer roaming the meadows and yards in Evergreen. However, they are essentially off limits for hunting because of restrictions on hunting in populated areas.

    To find wild game for their dinner tables, Evergreen residents Kim Herfurt and Tim Wulf head to state wildlife management areas and private lands where they are permitted to hunt during regulated seasons with licenses from Colorado Parks and Wildlife.

  • Wintering juncos are hard to distinguish

    A friend asked if I would write about the junco complex again this week because she said, “They are showing up in large numbers at my feeders, and once more, I can’t tell them apart.” Well, all I could say was “Join the club,” for we are all having the same problem.

  • Mount Evans road closed until Memorial Day weekend

    You'll have to view the fall colors on Mount Evans from afar for the rest of the year — the Mount Evans Scenic Byway has closed.

    The highest paved road in North America was open later than usual this fall because construction work delayed its opening until early August, according to the Colorado Department of Transportation. It typically opens the Friday before Memorial Day and closes the day after Labor Day.

  • Spectacular colors highlight visit over Boreas Pass

    On Tuesday, Sept. 22, two friends took me on a trip over Boreas Pass. It was a delight.

    This has been one of my favorite trips for many years. It is nearby, covers some of the best mountain area and has great distant views of aspen. My late husband, Bill, and I used to go south on U.S. 285 to Como, then northwest over the pass to Breckenredige, have lunch there and then make a fast trip home over routes 9 and 70.

    This time we reversed this trip, going out on I-70, then south to Breckenridge, then going over the pass from west to east, then back home on U.S. 285.

  • Silver Lakes residents want trail routed elsewhere

    Bicyclists are not held in high regard in the Silver Lakes neighborhood in Dumont.

    Because they believe that cyclists generally don’t generally follow traffic rules and leave a mess in their wake, many residents don't want a planned new greenway recreational trail to run through the neighborhood.

    About 50 people attended a meeting Sept. 23 at the Dumont School, virtually all of them to protest any trail planned through their neighborhood on the south side of Interstate 70. Many raised their voices.  

  • Barn swallows at Elk Run working on summer’s second brood

    I have had so many people ask about the barn swallows nesting under the porte-cochere at the entrance to Elk Run that I feel I must write about them again.

    Barn swallows built this nest sometime in July and have successfully raised one brood of four young. As their name implies, they usually nest on an open beam in a barn. I believe this was the first nesting in this nest.

  • CDOT installing remote-control avalanche triggers

    In the avalanche-prone area known as Seven Sisters on Loveland Pass, three men worked at dizzying heights above the ski slopes with a pneumatic rock drill.

    Workers with Harrison Western Construction battled to dig 10 feet into the side of the mountain to install what the Colorado Department of Transportation hopes is the last word in avalanche mitigation.

    Last Friday, CDOT contractors installed the latest piece of the $980,000 Gazex remotely triggered avalanche system.