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Today's News

  • CDOT finds high-speed transit not fiscally feasible

    Even though CDOT has determined that high-speed transit along the I-70 corridor is not financially feasible, local proponents and officials insist that funding can be found in the future.

    The cost estimate to build an Interstate 70 rail line is $16.5 billion from DIA to Eagle, or $105 million per mile.  

    CDOT released a draft report Feb. 19 analyzing the proposed transit systems for the I-70 and I-25 corridors, and found both too costly. High-speed transit along I-25 would have cost $13.6 billion.

  • CDOT finds high-speed transit 'not financially feasible'

    Even though CDOT has determined that high-speed transit along the I-70 corridor is not financially feasible, local proponents and officials insist that funding can be found in the future.

    The cost estimate to build an Interstate 70 rail line is $16.5 billion from DIA to Eagle, or $105 million per mile.  

    CDOT released a draft report Feb. 19 analyzing the proposed transit systems for the I-70 and I-25 corridors, and found both too costly. High-speed transit along I-25 would have cost $13.6 billion.

  • Better undead than unfed

    The Idaho Springs Library was the venue for a pint-sized zombie invasion on Feb. 14.

  • Avalanche danger at historic levels

    The Colorado Department of Transportation is working overtime to mitigate avalanche threats in Clear Creek County, and officials say they’re seeing some of the toughest conditions in nearly three decades.

    The Colorado Avalanche Information Center considers Clear Creek to have a “considerable” level of threat, caused by significant snow, varied weather conditions and high winds. Four people have been killed in avalanches this month in other parts of the state. 

  • Vision document to steer land-use, transit decisions

    A road map for future land-use, recreation and transportation decisions in Clear Creek County moved a step closer to fruition last week.

    The need for high-speed transit on I-70, better travel options for locals during peak traffic, and affordable housing are recurring themes in the document.

    During a January work session, 50 government officials, residents and businesspeople discussed issues and solutions to provide a guide for local officials and others based on local residents’ priorities.

  • Tourism Bureau installs 3 new signs

    The Clear Creek County Tourism Bureau recently installed three signs in the county to advertise amenities to tourists.

    The aluminum signs, installed Jan. 29, are at Floyd Hill, near Loveland Ski Area and on Berthoud Pass. 

    The bureau hopes the new, more durable signs will catch the eye of passing motorists.

    The county’s previous sign near Loveland was destroyed by a motorist some years ago, and the sign on Floyd Hill recently was knocked down by 150-mph winds. The sign on Berthoud Pass is a new addition.

  • Where there’s smoke, there’s profit

    Local marijuana entrepreneurs say they are still reaping the benefits in the wake of sales of recreational pot becoming legal in Colorado on Jan. 1.

    According to Idaho Springs City Administrator Cindy Condon, it’s still too early to guess what the fledgling industry will generate in sales-tax revenue, but business owners insist the future is bright.

    “It was a good month,” Theran Snyder, owner of the Kine Mine in Idaho Springs, said about January. “I couldn’t be happier with business; there’s no doubt about that.”

  • Bookworm Ball should be a page-turner of a fund-raiser for Mt. Evans Hospice

     By Stephanie DeCamp

    Staff Writer

    Evergreen is known for being a home to a variety of characters, and Mt. Evans Hospice hopes to bring a lot of colorful types out for its annual formal fund-raiser.

    At the Bookworm Ball, scheduled for Feb. 22 at Mount Vernon Country Club, locals can come as their favorite characters — the ones that populate literature, that is.

  • Home, sweet Little Bear

     By Stephanie DeCamp

    Staff Writer

    For Nitty Gritty Dirt Band founder John McEuen, his gig at the Little Bear on Sunday night was a homecoming — from a musician’s and a wanderer’s perspective. 

  • Evangelical church opens campus along I-70

    Flatirons Community Church in Lafayette has expanded to Genesee with a West Campus facility that officially opened its doors to members and visitors Sunday.

    After an extensive search, leaders of the congregation bought the large church building that stood vacant for the past two years since Lookout Mountain Community Church moved because of shrinking membership.