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Today's News

  • County schedules road work

    Pavement repairs were under way this week on Yankee Creek Road from Upper Bear Creek Road to Willow Creek Road. The work consists of milling and repaving the westbound lane. During construction hours, traffic control measures including flaggers will be in place.

    Grading and paving operations on Murphy Road from Upper Bear Creek Road to Siesta Circle also were planned this week. Traffic control measures including flaggers will be in place.

  • County schedules road work

    Pavement repairs were under way this week on Yankee Creek Road from Upper Bear Creek Road to Willow Creek Road. The work consists of milling and repaving the westbound lane. During construction hours, traffic control measures including flaggers will be in place.

    Grading and paving operations on Murphy Road from Upper Bear Creek Road to Siesta Circle also were planned this week. Traffic control measures including flaggers will be in place.

  • Evergreen fawn makes national news

     Evergreen has a new celebrity. Unfortunately, though, she has not been seen since making her debut, which was covered by Buzzfeed and news outlets across the country.

    The little four-legged star made local news after she wandered into a Kittredge family's yard on June 15.

  • Vox

    When will the county get it about Henderson?

    Editor:

    I am not surprised that Henderson Mine officials are saying “no” to being taxed for most of a new $4.65 million health clinic. They have given generously in the past, such as the rec center renovation. But it is common sense: If Henderson was enjoying enough of a profit to be generous, then why would it be preparing to shut down here?

  • The country that we have become

    “How is it possible that suffering that is neither my own nor of my concern should immediately affect me as though it were my own, and with such force that it moves me to action?”

    — Arthur Schopenhauer, “On the Basis of Morality”

  • Board wants to head off turmoil in schools

    Members of the Clear Creek school board wondered at a study session last Thursday what they could do to ensure that schools they oversee are not in turmoil.

    The discussion came about after district Superintendent Roslin Marshall updated them on a consultant who is helping King-Murphy administrators, teachers and parents work through issues that have created a negative climate at the school.

  • Commission candidate Wood focused on county finances

    County commission candidate Sean Wood says the county needs to continue to tighten its belt to prepare for an economic future without the Henderson Mine.

    The Evergreen resident, financial adviser and longtime volunteer with the Evergreen Fire Department is running for the District 2 commission seat in November's election.

    The District 2 position is currently held by former school board president Peter Monson, who was appointed in March by the governor to fill the late Tom Hayden's seat. Monson is not running for election.

  • Cops nab suspects in burglary attempt

    Law enforcement pursued a man and woman on Friday that ended in their arrest near the Rocky Mountain Easter Seals Camp in Empire.

    Cody Travis Werth, 19, was arrested in connection with a series of charges including first-degree criminal trespass, criminal mischief, attempted vehicle theft and reckless endangerment.

    Charges are pending against the woman, Corbin Arens, 34.

    Police received a call of a man and woman attempting to steal from a Jeep near mile marker 17.2 on Guanella Pass.

  • Officials honor work of Clear Creek EMS

    The recent mass shooting in Orlando was on everyone's mind when the county commissioners and a school board member recognized the work of Clear Creek EMS at a commission meeting June 14.

    School board member Joseph O'Leary presented Clear Creek EMS director Nicolena Johnson with a certificate of appreciation for participating in a mass-shooter exercise at the high school in the spring.

    "We hope this would never happen," O'Leary said. "It shows that our emergency-service providers are prepared for this eventuality."

  • Youngsters help retire American flags

    Working as methodically as possible, 11-year-old Tavien Woods cut the first strip off a 60-foot American flag.

    Friends followed his lead, and they reduced the giant flag to pieces that could be put into a fire and burned in the hot summer air.