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Today's News

  • Yesteryear’s guests bring the past to life at Hotel de Paris Museum

    The Countess Magri was the most famous person ever to stay at the Hotel de Paris in Georgetown.
    The countess, probably better known as the former Mrs. General Tom Thumb, appears to have been the most famous person to sign the guestbook in 1893, anyway. Before she married Count Magri, an Italian, the countess was well known in popular American culture. She and her husband were internationally known through the marketing and promotion efforts of circus master P.T. Barnum.

  • Detective was true to his mission, and himself

    Detective Al Billinger had his own special brand of “roadside justice” during the patrol years of his 29-year career with the sheriff’s department in Clear Creek County.

  • CURRENTS

    We’d like to know about interesting events or activities. E-mail items of 125 words or less to couranteditor@evergreenco.com.

    Sept. 5
    The Social Ethics Club will host a potluck meeting at the Idaho Springs Elks Lodge at noon Friday, Sept. 5. The club welcomes visitors, so if you would like to join the group, call Carla at 303-567-2179.  

    Sept. 6

  • Yesteryear’s guests bring past to life at hotel museum

    The Countess Magri was the most famous person ever to stay at the Hotel de Paris in Georgetown.

    The countess, probably better known as the former Mrs. General Tom Thumb, appears to have been the most famous person to sign the guestbook in 1893, anyway. Before she married Count Magri, an Italian, the countess was well known in popular American culture. She and her husband were internationally known through the marketing and promotion efforts of circus master P.T. Barnum.

  • Idaho Springs hires community developer

    Tim Katers is the new interim community developer in Idaho Springs.

    City council members hired Katers to work part-time at an hourly rate, as all the city’s job descriptions are re-evaluated. The hourly rate and the future budget for the job were not immediately available from the city. Katers said he expects the job to grow to a full-time position in the coming months.

  • Labor of love: Unheralded workers form the core of Clear Creek community

    If a dog is barking or a horse goes on the lam, folks call Jeromie Morgan, one of two animal control officers in Clear Creek County.

    In fact, Morgan spends quite a bit of his work time looking for pet owners. If a dog is running loose, animal control officers will respond right away and try to find the owner, Morgan said. If a dog is barking, he also follows up with the owner, who oftentimes professes ignorance.

    “Those are the easy ones. (Owners say they) aren’t aware that the dogs are barking when they’re not home,” Morgan said.

  • CURRENTS

    We’d like to know about interesting events or activities. E-mail items of 125 words or less to couranteditor@evergreenco.com. 

    Sept. 6

  • G-town Loop working to open Everett Mine for tours

    The Georgetown Loop Railroad is hoping to strike it rich by refurbishing an old silver mine to attract more tourists.

    Workers are excavating the Everett Mine, which is near the Lebanon Mine. Both are north of Georgetown, and tours are conducted through the Lebanon Mine.

    Loop marketing manager Tom Hill said the Lebanon Mine is such a popular destination for tourists riding the train that there's not enough room in the mine to accommodate them.

  • Time machines: Historic hot rods will re-create Georgetown’s other Golden Age

    The Silver Queen will be awash in steel and chrome on Saturday, Sept. 13, as up to 70 vintage road-rockets roar back into Georgetown for the second annual Hot Rod Hill Climb.

    “These aren’t sports cars,” says Mike Nicholas, chief wrench at Nick’s Garage in Englewood and the man who kicked the Hill Climb back into high gear last summer. “These are the drag cars of the early ‘50s running four-bangers, flathead-8s and early in-line motors.”

  • Idaho Springs hires community developer

    Tim Katers is the new interim community developer in Idaho Springs.

    City council members hired Katers to work part-time at an hourly rate, as all the city’s job descriptions are re-evaluated. The hourly rate and the future budget for the job were not immediately available from the city. Katers said he expects the job to grow to a full-time position in the coming months.