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Columns

  • Tobacco-Free Clear Creek kicks off in county on Nov. 19

    Clear Creek County Public and Environmental Health announces its new tobacco prevention and health education program, Tobacco-Free Clear Creek — with the goal to reduce tobacco use and secondhand smoke exposure in the county.

  • Messages for those involved with I-70

    The results are in: The Rail to Vail is a success!

    Well, OK, there’s no train through the Interstate 70 corridor providing rapid transit for Summit and Eagle county snow riders, but there were two from Denver’s Union Station to Winter Park on March 14 and 15, and they sold out in hours.

    Skiers and boarders, as well as those who wanted to visit the area for just fun, were elated. No doubt some rode the train for nostalgic and “to-be-cool” reasons, but others appreciated the alternative to the never-to-be-ending I-70 morass.

  • I-70 puts county at a fork in the road

    It’s been inevitable Clear Creek arrive at the fork in the road that will have profound outcomes on the county in our lifetimes and beyond. Along with the lifespan of the Henderson operation, actions taken in context of the Interstate 70 corridor will have more impact on our community’s future than any other challenge: economically, socially, environmentally and more.

  • Christmas stolen from Clear Creek

    The Christmas season: The time when good boys and girls find delightful presents in their stockings. That might be happening elsewhere, but here in Clear Creek, the Grinch has stolen Christmas.

    Dr. Seuss could’ve had the Colorado Department of Transportation in mind as a model for his creepy villain, given how CDOT muck-a-mucks must’ve decided the good citizens and merchants of Clear Creek have been naughty instead of being cooperative, supportive and patient stakeholders.

  • CIA’s culture needs an overhaul

    Since the 15th century when Tomas de Torquemada made his mark, his name has become synonymous with torture. Torquemada was a Dominican monk, quite pious, it is said, in his private life but fanatical in his public role. He was appointed by Spain’s Most Catholic Majesties Ferdinand II and Isabella I of Spain to head the Inquisition.

    Torquemada was aptly named, in that torque means “to twist, turn, turn about, twist awry, and torture.” That is what he did to human bodies.

  • November election was good and bad

    It’s been a month since the 2014 elections, and the post-mortems have been written ad infinitum. I promise to be brief with regard to it.

  • Assisted suicide a contentious battle

    “Death, be not proud, though some have called thee

    Mighty and dreadful, for, thou art not so,

    For, those whom thou think’st, thou dost overthrow

    Die not, poor Death, nor yet canst thou kill me.”

    — John Donne, “Holy Sonnets: Number 10”

    “I am not suicidal,” wrote Brittany Maynard. “If I were, I would have consumed that medication long ago. I do not want to die. But I am dying. And I want to die on my own terms.”

  • Reflecting on not-so-glorious history

    For the past several months, the world has been confronted with the horror of psychopaths beheading hostages. Decent men and women have decried the subhuman behavior by ISIS, the Islamic State. President Obama condemned the latest of five-to-date executions as “an act of pure evil by a terrorist group.”

    One-hundred-fifty years ago on Nov. 29, 1864, American “soldiers” engaged in a similar atrocity, an act of barbarism that has become known as the Sand Creek Massacre.

  • It’s becoming an ennui time of year

    Ennui: I have loved the word since my 11th-grade English class with Mr. Laurence. He was a stickler for vocabulary and was one of the teachers who stirred my imagination most when it comes to language.
    I notice now, especially while doing crossword puzzles, my vocabulary recall slipping. Old age? Or perhaps lack of use? Perhaps both, but for some reason, ennui remains fresh.

  • Elect pragmatic leaders to office

    If you’ve been reading my columns over the past several weeks, you might’ve noted one consistent refrain or mantra: “principled, pragmatic, problem-solving leadership.” One might call it the 3PRs.
    3PR is a philosophical approach to dealing with our societal great issues: economic, environmental, social justice, et al.