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Columns

  • Udall works tirelessly for Colorado

    The 2014 election is shaping up as a referendum on the Colorado electorate: Do we mean what we say when we claim we want pragmatic, principled, problem-solving leadership or are we just paying lip-service to that notion?

  • Gardner is a political chameleon

    Ploy. Ruse. Each, particularly when advanced by a public servant, indicates conniving underhandedness unworthy of serious consideration and provides the observer insight into the true character of the individual.

    Describe it as one will, the latest proposal put forth by Senate candidate Cory Gardner to allow over-the-counter birth-control pills is hardly an expression of genuine concern for women’s health and for protection of their right to privacy by controlling their reproductive systems.

  • Testing hurts innovation, creativity

    In last week’s column, I wrote about the need for parents to embrace their role as their child’s primary teacher. An essential truth is that for a child to live up to and meet his/her academic potential, education must be valued in the home by parents and reinforced each day through modeling — reading, reviewing their child’s homework, doing their own homework — for in the end, teachers are not miracle workers.

  • Parents should embrace educator role

    In my book, Neil Zeron was one of the greats. As a rookie teacher struggling to hold my head above water in a sea of 13-year-olds whose last desire was to sit in an eighth-grade American history class, Neil was a font of wisdom. He became my mentor, a trusted guide into and through the byzantine labyrinth of teaching.
    During one conversation at happy hour, which became our debriefing sessions, I reflectively mused what it would be like to see how “my kids” turned out later in their lives.

  • Blaming victims, victimizing blameless

    Behind every personal and/or group interaction, what Herman Melville calls the “living act, the undoubted deed,” is a message intended to communicate a psychological construct or emotion ranging from caring and compassion to contempt and anger.

  • Time for school board to come clean

    “A little water clears us of this deed.”
     — Lady Macbeth

    Let’s pick up where I left off last week: with the untimely decapitation of Todd Lancaster, our erstwhile superintendent.
    I e-mailed Peter Monson, an old friend, colleague and longtime member of the Board of Education, inviting the board and “interim” superintendent Roslin Marshall to my KYGT-FM show to give them the opportunity “to clear the air regarding ‘Toddgate.’ ”

  • Life lessons can be rude awakening

    The other day, a friend asked me how I come up with ideas about what to write, and I told her the problem isn’t coming up with them as much as deciding upon one. That’s my pleasant problem this week, so to wit:

  • An imaginary news conference

    “It’s simple: Mark Udall is avoiding an unpopular president,” former state GOP chairman Dick Wadhams told the Denver Post after Sen. Udall chose to stay in Washington to cast votes during President Obama’s visit to Colorado. Hmmm, I thought, imagining a news conference held by Republican nominee Cory Gardner:
     “This is outrageous,” exclaims Gardner. “For Mark Udall to violate a time-honored tradition is simply inexcusable.”

  • Business and religion don’t mix

     “The court, I fear, has ventured into a minefield,” writes Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsberg about the recently adjudicated Hobby Lobby case. In her dissent, she asks pointed questions of the all-male, religious-centered majority including “Do for-profit corporations rank among persons who exercise religion?”

    Ginsberg quotes the first chief justice John Marshall, who declared a corporation “an artificial being, invisible, intangible and existing only in contemplation of the law.”  

  • El Paso turned the tide for Beauprez

     Leading up to the Republican gubernatorial primary June 24, the Colorado Springs Gazette ran an editorial May 19 urging candidates Mike Kopp and Scott Gessler to drop out of the race to ensure that Bob Beauprez would win the nomination over Tom Tancredo. The Gazette argued that Tancredo was not a viable candidate in the general election and that Gov. John Hickenlooper’s re-election would be a sure thing if Tancredo became the Republican nominee.