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Columns

  • It’s good to embrace controversy

    In the past six months, the universe of Obamacare has changed as rapidly, it seems, as the universe did six months after the Big Bang. Once on life support and given last rites by ministers of the political right, Obamacare has rebounded, much to Republicans’ chagrin. Democrats should only hope Republicans make it their central issue in the fall campaign; that is, if they’re willing to trumpet its success.

  • Unequal prosperity equals injustice

    If we’re to move forward to develop an economy that allows for the potential of every American to be successful, it’s imperative to move away from the either-or dichotomy of looking at capitalism: Either one has blind faith and is a fervent believer in it, or one is considered a socialist. That notion is nonsense on several levels, but suffice to say those who profess that are being simplistic.

  • Northwestern football players 7, NCAA 0

     I’m no union guy. I think the unions have generally outlived their usefulness in our country, and that’s why only about 11 percent of American workers are union members, compared to nearly one-third in the early ’70s. Today the majority of union members are employees in the public sector, where the relationship between employer and employee has always been more contractual than relational.

  • Wealth disparity keeps widening

    On April 20, 2014, members of the Greek Orthodox Church will celebrate Easter, coinciding with the date for Western-rite Christians. On April 20, 1914, 100 years to the day, the Greek Orthodox Church again celebrated its Easter, but for 18 Greek Orthodox women and children of miners in Ludlow, Colo., that Easter Sunday was a day not of resurrection but of death, huddled together dying of smoke inhalation from fires set by goon squads sent by coal magnates and the Colorado militia, which operated at their behest. 

  • Legislators racing to the finish line

    They’re rounding the final turn and headed for the home stretch as your 69th Colorado General Assembly begins to wrap things up. Because of the limits in our constitution, the legislature must adjourn by May 7, just five weeks from today.

    The House passed the 2014-15 state budget last week, and the Senate will complete its version by Friday. They should be able to resolve any differences by next week, and we’ll be in the mad dash to the finish line.

  • Politics should not dictate views

    There is nothing wrong with changing one’s mind, especially when confronted with new information. In fact, it’s a virtue; intellectual honesty requires it.

    Long-entrenched thinking takes time to “evolve,” as Presidents Obama’s has on same-sex marriage. On that, he’s far from alone; millions of Americans have moved to support the principle, a vast change from homophobic days when a mad rush cluttered state constitutions with amendments defining marriage as between opposite-sex couples.

  • Let users pay for I-70 solutions

    The I-70 corridor is a mess on a few days — less than 40 out of 365 days of the year. 

    That’s about 10 percent of the time, and even that is overstating the case because on those days, the congestion is limited to usually no more than six hours, or one-fourth of the day. One-fourth of 10 percent is 2.5 percent. That’s it for the entire year. 

  • State now ground zero in battle for Senate

     Talk about a game changer!

    Polling has suggested that U.S. Sen. Mark Udall is vulnerable as he seeks re-election this fall, but conventional wisdom was that none of his announced challengers were gaining much traction.

    Then, last week, less than a week before precinct caucuses would mark the formal beginning of the process for major parties to choose their nominees, Congressman Cory Gardner dropped a bombshell when he announced he would abandon his re-election campaign for the 4th Congressional District and challenge Udall instead.

  • Highway histrionics all about funding

     If the comments at state Rep. KC Becker’s town hall meeting can serve as a barometer, there’s considerable apprehension about the I-70 corridor, understandably so given the recent brouhaha about the Boulder Turnpike being essentially handed over to foreign nationals. What next?  

  • Making student testing more palatable

     Robert Zubrin perfectly fits the mold of an independent thinker. Zubrin is the president of Pioneer Energy and author of “Energy Victory.”  

    One might, then, given his credentials, stereotype him as a proponent of testing students until their brains turn to mush. But he isn’t; in fact, in a column titled “Colorado’s school testers flunk themselves” in the Denver Post, Zubrin dissects the arguments that the test-until-they-drop crowd offer.