.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Education

  • Young weather watcher provides flurry of data

    Luke Dulski loves snow — and rain and sun and any other type of weather you can think of. So much so, that he became a junior weather watcher for KCNC-Channel 4.

    That means 8-year-old Luke regularly sends weather data to the Denver TV station’s meteorologists, and on Dec. 9, he helped meteorologist Ashton Altieri deliver the bus-stop forecast on the 6:30 a.m. news.

    The broadcast has been shown throughout King-Murphy Elementary School, where Luke is a second-grader.

  • Hour of Code is time well spent for fourth-graders

    If there’s one thing the Hour of Code has taught fourth-graders at King-Murphy Elementary, it’s the W.E. Hickson adage, “If at first you don’t succeed, try, try again.”

    The fourth-graders spent time in the school’s computer lab recently learning about computer science and programming.

    “I think I have to figure out how to do this,” student Tucker Langelier mused during a coding lesson. Minutes later he exclaimed: “I figured out what I messed up!”

  • Bench fills deep-seated need for friendship

    Children feeling left out or lonely on the playground soon will find a helping hand in Carlson Elementary School’s new buddy bench.

    Last Thursday near the Idaho Springs football field, social worker Lauren Courtney helped paint the wooden bench the school’s vibrant yellow and blue colors.

    The bench will be presented to the students later this month and find its permanent home on the playground. Not just anyone can sit on the bench; you have to be looking for a friend.

  • King-Murphy kids offer thanks

    Friday was a big day for the fourth-graders at King-Murphy Elementary.

    They hosted a Veterans Day celebration for the school, and that included welcoming about a dozen veterans to a coffee-and-doughnut reception before the school-wide assembly.

    The students, some dressed in suits and party dresses, were well-prepared to engage the veterans in conversation between young and old.

    Questions about the vets’ service included: How was the food? What was your job? What was your favorite memory? Do you still keep in touch with people you served with?

  • Middle school students learn about flirting versus hurting

    Those awkward teenage years include a lot of “firsts”: first time driving a car, first time staying home alone, and the inevitable first crush. But how do young adults learn the boundaries between flirting and hurting?

  • King-Murphy identifies steps to solve school’s problems

    King-Murphy Elementary School has a plan of action to change the negative culture in the building and try to boost declining enrollment.

    The school’s principal and representatives from the faculty and PTA presented the school board on Oct. 11 with steps they hope to complete this year to turn things around.

  • Fun run raises funds, community spirit at King-Murphy

    The King-Murphy PTA’s second annual fun run fund-raiser on Friday morning was a success in several ways:

    • Students enjoyed the 38-degree fresh air as they ran laps around the turf field. Most of the younger students ran at least 1.5 miles in about 30 minutes, with a few running closer to 3 miles. The first group included the preschoolers through second-graders, with the older students running later.

  • A clear look at science in the field

    Clear Creek High School’s Advanced Placement environmental science students have taken their book-learning into the field: They have become “citizen scientists,” testing the water in Clear Creek for the environmental group River Watch.

    Each month the 14 students visit a spot near the Tributary at 244 armed with sampling bottles, thermometers, nets and ice-cube trays — along with a couple pairs of waders — to test the water to determine the creek’s health.

  • King-Murphy’s Unique Tea celebrates kids’ individuality

    Just call Ryan Sandblom “Captain One Sock.”

    According to his dad, the King-Murphy Elementary School kindergartner loses his socks so frequently that his family began referring to him by that nickname. But it’s just one of the ways in which Lee Sandblom says his son is unique.

  • For new King-Murphy principal, ‘it’s all about relationships’

    It’s 8:10 a.m. last Thursday at King-Murphy Elementary School, and interim principal Joe Majeski stands in front of the school, greeting students as they get off the buses.

    He gets hugs from a few students, tousles a few heads and tells many of them, “Be smart. Be polite today.”

    Majeski always begins and ends the school day with bus duty, and he makes sure to check in with bus drivers to make sure the trips went smoothly. He also greets parents who drove their children to school.