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Columns

  • Fabyanic: Dog-eat-dog education

    Two recent reports dealing with education paint a grim picture of attitudes about it. Statewide, Colorado children are being compelled to attend school in squalid buildings unfit for human occupation. Nationwide, super-wealthy, socially insecure parents are cheating and lying their scions’ ways into elite colleges and universities.

    A recent Washington Post article drew national attention to Colorado’s indifference to children, especially in poorer school districts. It pointed out that statewide classroom and infrastructure needs now stand at $14 billion.

  • Byerley: Through the valley

    One of my favorite hymns is “In the Valley He Restoreth My Soul.” Lately it keeps running through my head during difficult times. It is a reminder that the valleys of life are a place to seek solace, experience healing and to live out our low points with the help of His strength and grace.

  • Byerley: County property conundrum

    What to do with Goldigger Field and the bus barn property is quite the conundrum. On one hand, I can understand the history and nostalgia, and wanting to preserve a green space for soccer practice, the annual homecoming football game, community events and club activities.

  • Fabyanic: Time to retire the Electoral College

    “It’s a disaster for a democracy, a total sham and a travesty.”

    — Donald Trump

    If Gov. Jared Polis signs SB 42, Colorado would join the National Popular Vote compact that would commit Colorado’s electoral votes to the winner of the national popular vote. The compact would take effect once enacted by states with 89 more electoral votes.

  • Fabyanic: Co-superintendents not a good idea

    Two thousand years ago, when the republic was collapsing, the Romans concocted a new leadership model: Triumvirate, a three-man team that split areas of governance. Slow to learn, they tried it twice before concluding that a leader cannot be divided. The emerging empire was thence controlled by a singular man, albeit an emperor with unlimited power.

  • Byerley: Dreams from my dogger

    My name is Rocky Marciano-Byerley, better known as Rock-Dog. Nicole Byerley is my human, and she let me write her column this week.

    I am a mountain dog, a forest dog, and I am our office mascot. I personally rule the woods, and trucks make me very, very angry. I growl and bark at them every chance I get.

    I can be found hanging out in the yard, chasing circles around the trees and running in deep snow. I also love to sleep on my super cozy big dog bed or snooze in the afternoon sun streaming through the window in the mining office.

  • Byerley: The bait-and-switch party

    Dems have increasingly become the party of bait-and-switch tactics — deceptively spinning webs of hope, change, progress and equality, while the outcomes of their policies create further division, regression and government dependence.

    Do they have nefarious purposes, or are they so ignorant that they don’t grasp the outcomes of what they are trying to sell us? I think it depends on the politician.

  • Fabyanic: Kakistocracy

    Kakistocracy is a real word, meaning government by the worst people. Its etymology is from kakistos, which is Greek for “worst.” Associate it with a child’s expression when you say “caca,” and you’ll remember it vividly.

  • Fabyanic: Gay conversion therapy

    To deal with non-compliant individuals who do something outrageous such as think for themselves or make personal life-affirming decisions, a common practice in totalitarian societies is to incarcerate offenders in re-education camps.

    There they undergo corrective behavior discipline until they exhibit right thinking. It’s called brainwashing, a mental cleansing, wiping the mind clean so to allow the washers to program the individual to believe and behave as they do.

  • Byerley: Integrated behavioral help

    Centura Health has proposed an Integrated Behavioral Health model for the permanent Idaho Springs clinic. This type of medical approach is desperately needed everywhere, especially in rural communities such as ours.

    Clinical medicine so often addresses symptoms and immediate needs, while neglecting to ask the right questions to dig down to the root cause of the problem. Behavioral health clinicians help to fill in this gap by asking deeper questions and getting to know individual needs and concerns.