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Columns

  • Greene: Can bears survive us?

    Colorado Parks & Wildlife manager Joe Walters had a simple answer when asked to identify the most difficult part of his job during the winter months.

    “Trying to get people to stop feeding deer,” he answered.

    People’s deer treat of choice — corn — is indigestible for the animal, causing an excruciating condition called “lactic acidosis.”

  • Fabyanic: Regular order institutionalist

    The late John McCain was an irascible fellow, a worthy debate adversary who could torch opponents with an impish smile and a glint in his eye. Despite his legendary temper, McCain never lost sight of his opponents’ humanity. He did not stoop to hurling insults to bolster a fragile ego. Perhaps it was because after five years as a POW, his ego was anything but fragile.

    That’s what made McCain’s call for a return to regular order so powerful.

  • Byerley: A win for parents

    The Colorado General Assembly officially ended on Friday. While some of the decisions were negative in my view, one bright spot came out of this year’s session: House Bill 1312, making it difficult for parents to exempt their children from getting vaccinated before entering school was squashed. The bill required parents to file a vaccination exemption with the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment, not just the school, essentially making it public record.

  • Byerley: Solace vs. inner isolation

    We retreat into the woods to seek solace, to find refuge from the constant activity and mental stressors. Reflecting on the beauty of nature and taking it all in. Retreating into nature brings us temporary peace and reflection, time to think about what is good and what we could be doing better. Time for silent prayer and room to ponder that which bothers us.

  • Fabyanic: Public education

    “Educate and inform the whole mass of the people. ... They are the only sure reliance for the preservation of our liberty.”
    — Thomas Jefferson

    It has been rewarding to play a role in bringing a new superintendent to the Clear Creek School District on board. Clear Creek citizens — Board of Education, students, teachers, community members — being engaged in such a noble civic endeavor speaks volumes of their commitment to taking their public schools increasingly to higher levels.

  • Fabyanic: Threading the needle

    Fight-or-flight has been a primal instinct since our days on the African savannah. Seventy thousand years ago, it was always life-or-death survival. Today, not so much. For us, it’s not a case of denying real existential threats but understanding there aren’t bogeymen hiding under the bed.

  • Byerley: Premium for parking

    Idaho Springs’ parking is at a premium, and city leaders now want us to pay a premium to park. For several years, there have been mutterings about paid parking in Idaho Springs.

    Beginning this summer, it seems these pontifications may become reality. As reported in last week’s Courant, the city’s “looking to partner” with Interstate Parking for paid parking and permit-only areas throughout downtown. Interstate contracts with area ski resorts to manage parking areas.

  • Byerley: Red flag ruckus

    By Nicole Byerley

    Innocent until proven guilty no longer stands in Colorado. Colorado Democrats’ latest unconstitutional tomfoolery has now become law and is causing quite the ruckus among the right-leaning and Libertarians in our state.

    House Bill 19-1177, the so-called “red flag” gun bill, was signed into law by our radical governor on Friday afternoon. The law is a disgusting attempt to preserve “public peace, health and safety” by stripping away citizens’ Second Amendment rights.

  • Fabyanic: CCSD commitment to excellence

    A guiding principle my University of Colorado professor Dr. John Haas instilled in me during my teacher-ed program is that schools reflect the communities in which they exist. Successful schools mirror communities that value their schools; flailing, struggling schools often do the opposite.

    In some places, a community’s commitment to its schools arises organically; in others, the community needs to be led, shown the value of their schools and its relationship with them.

  • Byerley: Spring!

    Could it be? The giant snow banks are beginning to melt, there is about three inches of mud on the road, and the birds are chirping.

    Could it finally be Spring at 10,000 feet in Clear Creek County? The thought is invigorating. Daylight saving time has left an energizing light glowing later into the day. We feel less like going home after work to shut it down and more like grabbing those trail shoes to enjoy our great outdoors.