A sporting season finale

Miner Street Market’s cornhole league wraps up summer of fun

Corinne Westeman
cwesteman@coloradocommunitymedia.com
Posted 9/8/21

This summer, dozens of people spent their Monday evenings playing cornhole on Miner Street. They loved the sense of camaraderie, the game, the prizes and the atmosphere that balances a relaxing and …

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A sporting season finale

Miner Street Market’s cornhole league wraps up summer of fun

Posted

This summer, dozens of people spent their Monday evenings playing cornhole on Miner Street.

They loved the sense of camaraderie, the game, the prizes and the atmosphere that balances a relaxing and casual feel with high-energy competition.

“It’s a super-fun group of people,” Floyd Hill’s Janine Schriner said. “It doesn’t matter the skill level; everyone has fun playing.”

On Aug. 30, the Rocky Mountain Cornhole league concluded its summer play with one final tournament along the 1600 block of Miner Street.

Schriner and her husband, Hunter, used to play at the rec center with Idaho Springs’ Mike Hill, who organized this summer’s league for the market. So, when the Schriners saw that local cornhole was back, they spent about six Mondays of their summer participating.

Hill said the league averaged 14-16 players each Monday, with about 20 at Aug. 30’s season finale. Hill felt the season had been a success overall, as it promoted business at several Miner Street establishments and gave people something fun to do outside on a summer evening.

“I would love to bring it back next year,” he continued. “I think the (business) owners are on board.”

Each week, the league rotated around local restaurants with El Azteca hosting the Aug. 30 event. The restaurants offered discounts on drinks and appetizers for the players, who were competing for some serious prize money.

With each player paying $10 to enter, Hill said that depending on how many were competing, the first-place team might split $100. There were cash prizes for the second- and third-place teams as well.

Hill added that there’s no age limit — with everyone from children to seniors playing — and no skill-level requirement.

While most players were county residents, Hill said the league often saw people from the Denver area and beyond. Because the league was listed on a cornhole app, several groups saw it and stopped to play while traveling to Wyoming, Iowa, Grand Junction and more.

Aaron Hysell traveled from Vail with his friends Daniel Stempien and Chris Gomez to attend the Aug. 30 tournament, with Hysell explaining that Idaho Springs was the closest venue to play in a cornhole tournament.

Hysell said he started playing regularly two months ago after he visited family in Florida. The game is very popular there, and he attended several competitions during his visit.

After that, he was hooked.

Playing in a league competition like the one on Miner Street is a little different than playing in a friend’s yard, Hysell explained. Rocky Mountain Cornhole has higher-quality bags that have different textures on each side, making one side slide faster on the wooden board than the other side.

Hysell said that he’s been working on different throws, but the key is throwing the bag as flat as possible to maintain the “fast” or “slow” side, depending on what the player wants.

Meeting and becoming a part of the local cornhole community has been a blast, he continued, and he said he would come back to play in Idaho Springs if the league returns next summer.

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