BizBeat: Georgetown guitarist helping next generation find their strum

Corinne Westeman
cwesteman@coloradocommunitymedia.com
Posted 3/23/21

Anyone looking to follow in the footsteps of Eddie Van Halen, B.B. King and Joan Jett can now find their frets and learn their tunes in downtown Georgetown. Musician Rob Solomon opened the Georgetown …

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BizBeat: Georgetown guitarist helping next generation find their strum

Posted

Anyone looking to follow in the footsteps of Eddie Van Halen, B.B. King and Joan Jett can now find their frets and learn their tunes in downtown Georgetown.

Musician Rob Solomon opened the Georgetown Guitar Studio, located at 405 Sixth St., in early January and said he’s found an untapped need in Clear Creek County.

Solomon offers beginner and intermediate-level lessons for guitar, bass and ukulele. About three-quarters of his students are young children learning a new instrument while the rest are adult guitarists who want to improve their skills.

He has started repairing instruments as well.

The Georgetown resident and musician has played across the state for decades, including at local venues and events. Later this spring, he will serve as the resident artist for 511 Rose St., a forthcoming restaurant and retail business.

In addition to his music career, Solomon also wants to pass on what he’s learned to Clear Creek residents.

“First impressions count,” he said, referring to not only a specific instrument but music in general. “ … I want to make the whole experience fun.”

Overall, he said, he’s enjoyed teaching.

He explained that, especially for children, half of what they learn is the music. The other half is a combination of self-esteem, discipline, respect, and music appreciation.

Solomon said his ultimate goal is to bring music to the Georgetown community, saying, “COVID has helped us realize how much we need music.”

While the studio’s website is still under construction, contact Rob Solomon at 970-412-6433 for information. Appointments are preferable.

Sixth Street spot offers
weekend desserts, cocktails

Take a speak-easy with old-fashioned cocktails, add a sweet shop’s array of desserts, sprinkle it with some Marie Antoinette-inspired décor and — voila! — you have Georgetown’s Sweet Easy.

Veronica Maes and her husband, Les, bought the building at 504 Sixth St. in December 2019 to provide Georgetown residents and visitors a place to meet for dinnertime cocktails and desserts.

Even though the pandemic slowed the renovation process, the couple opened Sweet Easy’s doors on Jan. 22.

So far, Maes said, people have enjoyed the speakeasy-style craft cocktails as well as the dessert menu.

Sweet Easy has salted caramel apple pie and two others on rotation, which Maes makes herself. It also offers freshly baked cookies, such as the recent pumpkin dark chocolate ones, and truffle popcorn.

Sweet Easy also has charcuterie.

While the business is only open on the weekends and has a capacity of 10 customers, Maes and her husband have seen a lot of locals — including meeting some residents who moved to town during the pandemic — as well as people visiting for a day or weekend.

Overall, Maes said, she wanted Sweet Easy to feel “like an extension of our living room,” between the classic feel and menu. The décor, she explained, is inspired by 1920s speakeasies as well as pre-revolutionary France.

Because of the limited capacity, Sweet Easy doesn’t take reservations except at the upcoming Easter brunch and other special occasions, Maes explained. She said locals are welcome to call 15 minutes beforehand to get an idea of availability, though.

Sweet Easy is open 3:30-8 p.m. on Fridays and Saturdays, and 2-6 p.m. on Sundays.

For more information, visit
sweeteasier.com or call 303-569-5134.

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