Cultivating natural beauty

Groups collaborate to plant wildflower seeds at CCHS

Deb Hurley Brobst
dbrobst@coloradocommunitymedia.com
Posted 5/24/21

Clear Creek High School students have been planting bombs — seed bombs, that is — on the school grounds. They hope the seeds will germinate and create beautiful clusters of wildflowers that …

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Cultivating natural beauty

Groups collaborate to plant wildflower seeds at CCHS

Posted

Clear Creek High School students have been planting bombs — seed bombs, that is — on the school grounds.

They hope the seeds will germinate and create beautiful clusters of wildflowers that will not only beautify the area but increase the biodiversity. The students are part of the EcoSchools club, and they spent an afternoon about a month ago creating 250 1-inch diameter bombs that consist of lupine, black-eyed Susan, daisy, Columbine and purple coneflower seeds mixed with clay and worm castings to bind them together.

Recently the teens took a walk outside along what will be a trail around the school grounds, throwing the seed bombs as they went. How coincidental that it was National Wildflower Week.

Participants hope the recent rain will help the seeds germinate.

CCHS science teacher Melissa English called the seed-bomb project a great collaboration among the EcoSchools club, Scraps-to-Soil and the CSU Extension program.

George Marlin with Scraps-to-Soil explained that usually the organization plans an event for Earth Day in April, but since that didn't work out, the seed-bomb idea was born. The wildflower initiative helps to inspire sustainable communities.

Chloe Alspaugh, president of CCHS EcoSchools, said the seed bombs were a unique way to reintroduce biodiversity onto school property, and students hoped information about wildflowers and biodiversity could be an education station along the trail.

We like to promote natural wildflowers and plans to improve the ecosystem,” said Christine Crouse with the CSE Extension in Clear Creek County, which donated the seeds. “It's important to take care of natural ecosystems.”

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