Habitat townhome decision postponed again to July 26

Corinne Westeman
cwesteman@coloradocommunitymedia.com
Posted 7/17/21

The Idaho Springs City Council has postponed its decision on proposed Habitat for Humanity townhomes along Virginia Street to its July 26 meeting. According to Mayor Mike Hillman, the extension will …

This item is available in full to subscribers.

Please log in to continue

Username
Password
Log in

Don't have an ID?


Print subscribers

If you're a print subscriber, but do not yet have an online account, click here to create one.

Non-subscribers

Click here to see your options for becoming a subscriber.

If you made a voluntary contribution in 2020-2021, but do not yet have an online account, click here to create one at no additional charge. VIP Digital Access includes access to all websites and online content.


Our print publications are advertiser supported. For those wishing to access our content online, we have implemented a small charge so we may continue to provide our valued readers and community with unique, high quality local content. Thank you for supporting your local newspaper.

Habitat townhome decision postponed again to July 26

Posted

The Idaho Springs City Council has postponed its decision on proposed Habitat for Humanity townhomes along Virginia Street to its July 26 meeting.

According to Mayor Mike Hillman, the extension will provide ample time to give notice all those within a 300-foot radius of the subject property about the discussion and vote.

“We want to make sure those notices go out, so everyone who was notified the first time (of the public hearing) will be notified again,” Hillman said at the council's July 12 meeting.

City Council first held a public meeting about the project on May 10, and continued it to June 12 to allow more time for research into statutory requirements. At the June 12 meeting, the council members voted 4-3 to deny the project's final development plan, which proposes building eight units at 1628 Virginia St.

Then, at its June 28 meeting, Blue Spruce Habitat for Humanity's legal counsel asked the council to reconsider and stated that local governments are limited in what they can require of projects, which is based on city code.

If Idaho Springs wants to require more of future projects, it can change the code to reflect that, he said, adding that the Virginia Street townhome project already met all the legal requirements, according to city staff.

The City Council voted unanimously to reconsider the application and subsequently continued it to July 12.

Throughout the process, several neighboring property owners have spoken out against the project, saying it will exacerbate the terrible road conditions along Wall Street and 16th Avenue.

During the July 12 meeting, residents reemphasized their concerns. Many of them said they supported Habitat for Humanity's work and affordable housing projects in general, but wanted the city and the nonprofit to work with them to find a solution that would work for everyone.

Wall Street resident Kim Steele said she supported the project and suggested the city make 16th Avenue and Virginia a cul-de-sac, put in a four-way stop at 16th Avenue and Colorado Boulevard, and make Virginia Street one-way eastbound.

Fellow Wall Street resident Rick Scott said the city should at least have a plan for these roads before making a final decision on the application.

Michael Kastenbaum, who also lives on Wall Street, commented that he would support a different version of the project and asked the City Council to take time to address residents' safety concerns.

Comments

Our Papers

Ad blocker detected

We have noticed you are using an ad blocking plugin in your browser.

The revenue we receive from our advertisers helps make this site possible. We request you whitelist our site.