Letter: We must insist on respect of the property of others and obey county regulations

Posted 8/23/22

Over this past spring, a developer purchased land at the top of a mountain with limited, very steep access. She proceeded to cut over 250 documented, labeled trees on four of her adjacent neighbors’ property without permission.

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Letter: We must insist on respect of the property of others and obey county regulations

Posted

Over this past spring, a developer purchased land at the top of a mountain with limited, very steep access. She proceeded to cut over 250 documented, labeled trees on four of her adjacent neighbors’ property without permission. Many of these were live trees, now oozing sap, branches littering the hillside. Clear cut swaths with no possible purpose, other than to carve out a road to the property without permits or permission. She continued to cut trees despite an arrest and further warnings from the sheriff’s department.

The woman in question is a developer and an engineer. As a professional, she should know about permits and private property rights, she should know better. 

A hearing in the criminal case against her will be heard at 9 a.m. on Aug. 30 at the courthouse in Georgetown, case 22CR45. Initial charges reflected the severity of her actions. But now we learn the District Attorney has decided to grant a plea agreement giving her diversion, a slap on the wrist. Diversion would be a disgrace to the landowners involved and the citizens of the county; it essentially gives a green light to this kind of behavior and would set a horrible precedent.

The public is welcome to attend the hearing, at 9 a.m. Aug. 30 in Georgetown. Hopefully individuals will have the opportunity to ask the court to reject the plea agreement offering diversion. We must insist on respect of the property of others and obey county regulations.

Etta Satter, Beaver Brook Canyon

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