Mudslide hits Georgetown, destroys trailer home

Andrew Fraieli
afraieli@coloradocommunitymedia.com
Posted 7/7/22

Late yesterday afternoon, a heavy downpour over Georgetown caused a mudslide that destroyed at least one trailer home, as well as dislodging boulders, rocks and debris that came down around the trailer homes above exit 228.

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Mudslide hits Georgetown, destroys trailer home

Posted

On July 6, a heavy downpour over Georgetown caused a mudslide that destroyed at least one trailer home, as well as dislodging boulders, rocks and debris that came down around the trailer homes above exit 228 on I-70.

Occupants from the homes were evacuated, with gas and power being turned off for the area.

According to Clear Creek County Undersheriff Bruce Snelling, boulders had fallen on the west-south side of the mountain wall between Silver Plume and Georgetown as well, with the mountainside netting stopping them.

Edward Alexander was inside his trailer home of 13 years when the mudslide that destroyed it began. He said that he was eating dinner when it began to rain so hard there was a half inch of rain pouring down his window.

“I got up to see how bad it was, saw the first of the mud came over the hill — it obliterated my shed, started to fill the backyard and then it stopped," he said. "I went, ‘OK, I can live with that.'

“About that time, some more mud came over, and there were boulders that came over the edge," he continued. "At that point I ran back to the bedroom, grabbed some clothes out of the dresser, out of the closet  — [my wife] was getting my cat and two dogs ready to go. I was getting dressed, and in the time it took me to do that, we had mud running through the living room.”

He estimates there was about 10 feet of mud where his shed was — 3 feet in his bedroom, 2 in the bathroom and about a foot in the living room.

Alexander said the police put him up in the Mountain Inn for the night, and the Red Cross is giving him supplies. He also said there is about 100 yards of rock, boulder and debris that have to be removed before he can clean out his house and he's afraid that the weight of the mud will move the house off its foundation.

“I’m surprised none of them got washed away, they’re in a bad spot,” Snelling said in regards to the trailer homes.

Snelling also said the mud covered most of the intersection up to the Georgetown’s roundabout. Alexander added that it shut down the  interstate and covered ground up to the Family Dollar.

Other trailer homes on the same road were affected, with mud sliding between a few of them.

As of publishing, the roads were cleared of mud, and the interstate no longer blocked.

The Georgetown Police Department could not be reached for comment.

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