The World is in Their Hands

GCS’ Earth Day event empowers students to make a difference

Corinne Westeman
cwesteman@coloradocommunitymedia.com
Posted 4/28/21

Georgetown Community School students have made a promise — to take care of the Earth. They promised to not pollute, to pick up litter, and to conserve water and electricity. In the third-grade …

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The World is in Their Hands

GCS’ Earth Day event empowers students to make a difference

Posted

Georgetown Community School students have made a promise — to take care of the Earth.

They promised to not pollute, to pick up litter, and to conserve water and electricity.

In the third-grade class, Avery promised not to harm the environment and not to step on grass; Kira, to compost food; Steve, to grow plants; Aurora, to save the oceans; and Elise, to not use a car.

GCS hosted its annual Earth Day event Friday and had each grade complete a rotation of activities in each teacher’s classroom. For instance, third-grade teacher Lorray Singmaster hosted an Earth Day promises activity.

Sixth-grader Merrell Harvey said his promise was to continue recycling and to use less plastic. He gave the example of doing less online shopping, which uses up a lot of plastic bubble-wrap.

“I don’t want my kids living in a world that’s trashed,” sixth grade student Finn Gower said, “and I don’t want to move to Mars.”

While the sixth-graders said the Earth Day promises activity was fun, they said the best station they’d visited so far was “All ‘Round the World” bingo in Faith Owen’s kindergarten classroom.

Owen explained that the older students got to play bingo with each square being a notable global landmark, such as the Taj Mahal, the Acropolis and Angkor Wat.

However, with younger students, she went through a list of everyday objects and asked whether they could be recycled.

Her goal was to help the children have fun, Owen said.

Meanwhile, first-grade teacher Chynna Candlin taught the students how to make birdseed cookies out of birdseed and gelatin. The cookies, she clarified, were for birds.

“It’s about doing something for nature, not just ourselves,” Candlin said of the activity.

Whenever a new class rotated into her room, Candlin passed out the mix and students always commented about the slimy feeling of the gelatin-covered birdseed. Some students thought it was cool, while others described it as gross.

Another texture-intense station was second-grade teacher Tiffany Taylor’s classroom where she demonstrated the science behind oil spills and their clean-up efforts.

Taylor said she wanted the students to learn “the consciousness of what we’re consuming — how to cut down on (oil spills) by cutting down on oil consumption.”

She and the sixth-graders discussed how they could do this by using fewer plastics and relying more on renewable energy sources.

“The older kids have been more understanding; they ask a lot of good questions,” Taylor said, adding that the younger students were more fascinated by the demonstration. “... They’re getting the idea.”

Overall, the teachers were happy to have a school-wide event, saying it’s the first time they’ve done so all year. Candlin said her students were excited to see the other teachers, and she was having fun interacting with the other classes.

Taylor commented: “We’re so happy we get to do this after staying in our classrooms all year.”

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